banana republic


our backyard, ever since i could remember, always had a banana plant or another (actually there was a time the whole place was planted to rows and rows of the plants, or are they trees?) anyway, my dad (who’s the designated gardener) had a good harvest from a “piling” recently. so we’re having potassium overload these days. one thing about these fruits is they spoil easily, and also, because our dining room is open, the birds think they’re laid out for them too 🙂 i don’t know what type these are, they taste like latondan (my favorite is lakatan). i hate the cavendish variety, it’s so devoid of flavor, i think that should be hog food instead (actually my former boss who used to work in Dole said they actually fed those to the animals).

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6 Comments Add yours

  1. Guagua Girl says:

    definitely plants …

    the lakatan is the orange-ish one, right? that's the variety i eat (note, i didn't say like), too. hate the katoldan, they feel slimy, LOL! mom and dad love bananas, i don't; so they always tease me about it. i said it was their fault anyway 😛 you remember the story about me bananas, prescription medication and my childhood, right?

    i remember during the floods, the banana plants would fall (weak roots or something) and we'd spear them with bamboos and lash several together with a rope to make a raft, HA HA HA.

    do you ever eat the heart (pusong saging)? i think they add those to sinigang …

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  2. Betis Boy says:

    they call the rafts “balsa”. admit it, we actually looked forward to the floods when we were kids right? first, no class, then second, fishing, third, rafting. life's good. ha.ha.

    ah, so they inserted the pill in the banana? works everytime 🙂 but ours was not as traumatic as yours, i guess. he.he.

    pusong saging is even better when it's cooked kinilaw style. (actually you do cook it). saute garlic and onions. put shrimp and/or meat (the fatty part the better, though ground pork will also do). then put in the banana heart sliced thinly. then vinegar, let is simmer, then water, salt and pepper. simmer some more until it's almost dry. another variation is to put some coconut milk, then birds eye chili. top with chicharon. woohoo!

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  3. Guagua Girl says:

    now, all i have to do is find pusong saging here 😉

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  4. Betis Boy says:

    try chinatown. i'm sure they have it there somewhere. i was laughing my ass off while watching a show on the food network about a white guy revisiting chinatown and ordering the comfort food of his youth — spring rolls, sweet and sour pork, wonton soup, and fried rice. he was with a chinese guy. this guy was looking at the waiter and both were snickering and rolling their eyes while the white guy was ordering. 😀 turns out this was the usual white man's fare. in reality, the chinese had a menu of their own, and so the guy proceeded to order his own childhood memory menu — kangkong in oyster sauce, snails in white wine sauce, crabs in egg and oyster sauce, steamed fish with leeks and soy sauce. the white guy asked him if their families (back when the chinese guy was young) would laugh at the white men's tables. the guy said, “well, i was laughing when you were ordering, right?” 😀 LOL!

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  5. Guagua Girl says:

    HA HA HA! i remember one time we were in one of our favorite restaurants in chinatown (mandarin court on mott street). we ordered stuff “off menu” such as snails in oyster sauce and the “tentacle” calamari with sea salt and garlic chips. i remember the look on the face of the white couple in the table next to ours when we started to suck in those tiny little buggers from their shells, LOL! then we kept bugging the waiters for the “good” vinegar for the calamari, he he he.

    one of my cousins actually lived and worked in china for almost a year when she was with robina corp. and she told me about her “culture” shock because the chinese food she was served was nothing like what she had growing up. AND SHE IS HALF CHINESE! HA HA HA!

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  6. Betis Boy says:

    hmmm. made me think if there's a real kapampangan cuisine hiding (hidden) somewhere 🙂 is there something we haven't eaten yet? LOL!

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