promdi memory: pasinorden

the budget airline i took on a recent trip always plays onboard games with passengers, the more famous of which is “bring me” (in this case, “show me”) because instead of bringing the item to the host, one simply has to raise it up. the first one to show it wins. well, anyway, i’ve been on a few flights lately and i’m sure they either ask for your boarding pass, the passenger safety instruction card, your passport, a ten-peso coin, a ballpen, etc. (though there was one time they asked for a belt). they give out very simple prizes (i’ve won two cellphone pouches, the last one i used as a passport holder) 🙂

the bring me game made me remember our own bring me game back then, complete with a sing-song kapampangan phrase whose real meaning escapes me until now. if you remember it yourself, this is how it goes. (the “host” means the one asking for the items. the rest are the game participants, who answer in unison).

host: pasinorden
all: indung makakalulu (merciful mother)
host: ninung apu mu? (who is your grandmother/grandfather?)
all: apung (insert name here) (in our case, it was always our grandaunt, apung gundang)
host: maliguang-maligua… (in a speedy fashion…) specify thing to bring or task to do

note that the host can either ask you to bring something or to do something (for example, bring lola’s pustiso (false teeth/dentures), pepper an aunt with kisses, smell somebody’s armpits 🙂

what a fun game 🙂 children today should be playing these games as well. aside from an education on body parts (and missing ones), it teaches speed, cunning, connivance, and when all else fails, blackmail (through incessant crying) till the person being requested to show the item or yield the body part relents 🙂

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Guagua Girl says:

    loved this game as a child … and the tasks/items were always very interesting, plus it's one of those games that any child, whatever age, can play. everybody gets to participate! i vaguely remember an instance where we were told to get white hair from an uncle (or was it an aunt?) and, to our consternation, he had just dyed it. didn't stop some of my cousins from combing his hair to see if he missed any, LOL!

    i think we need those board games on the longer flights … that's one of the things i'm dreading about visiting the philippines — the 15 hours i get to spend in a plane (that's not counting the second leg of the trip)

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  2. Betis Boy says:

    your angry birds can kill a lot of pigs in 15 hours! 😀 my cousin brought up some weird-sounding names on facebook that i vaguely remember (pokpok sakeok, dosimako-dosimakwe). i think i need to ask the elders what those are all about 🙂

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  3. Guagua Girl says:

    wait, did you get angry birds? LOL!

    oh and hey! you don't need to ask the “elders.” you should know these games/lines. at least i do. am i dating myself by admitting i know what you're talking about with the dosimako-dosimakwe? even popok sakeok (i believe the rest of the words go “babaung taklang manok!) the pokpok one is a game with babies. honestly. seriously. yes, despite the name of the game. pokpok didn't always mean what it means now.

    i digress … so, you have the baby lying down, you hold his little feet and bounce them a little on your hands or clap with them, all the while chanting “pokpok, sakeok, babaung taklang MANOK!” and you say the last words out loud and pretend like you're gonna drop the baby's feet and then the little baby gurgles with delight … and then you do it all over again, HA HA HA! yeah, i spent some time baby-sitting 😛

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  4. Betis Boy says:

    ha.ha. so they used “babung taklang manok” with you. i think what i remember is “mabuluk a palatut” (same number of syllables so i think that works too) 🙂 or maybe our elders made them up. look at my fb page, an older relative posted another sung game that is totally alien to me. it might sound familiar to you, growing up in the barrio and all (LOL!) 😛

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