bloodstained rice

if you are the queasy and squeamish type, look away quick! you shouldn’t have continued reading this post after reading the title 😛

anyway, we had two great surprises this morning by way of two live chickens given to us by my cousin who raised them in his backyard. so they were made into tinola for lunch and asado for dinner. since chicken (like the rest of the animal products we eat, unless we’re a circus act) have to be killed in order to be ready for cooking, our maid did so the traditional way — that is by bleeding it. since we grew up in a culture of practicality (brought about by need), even the blood is not wasted by collecting it in a plate with uncooked rice.

the blood mixture is then left for around 30 minutes for it to clot, forming a blood cake. the cake is then sliced into smaller pieces and then included in the cooking broth. together with the gizzard, the liver, the neck and other giblets, the cooked blood is one of the sought-after items in the soup dish. i’m sure you’ve had this before, right?

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4 Comments Add yours

  1. Guagua Girl says:

    damn, i've been thinking about making tinola and now i think i really have to after seeing your post. but i won't be murdering any chicken myself. i'll go to stop & shop and grab a family pack of wings. sadly, i haven't had the “blood cake” or the gizzards in a long time.

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  2. Betis Boy says:

    actually i can't remember the last time we had the bloodcake prior to this post. it's like eating back in time.

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  3. Guagua Girl says:

    i was reading something about china last night and the book mentioned how the chinese often use a single chicken to prepare a variety of dishes. then it goes on to say that “chicken blood is cooked and solidified for soup.” so we got that practice from the chinese, neh?

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  4. Betis Boy says:

    that's why chinese rhymes with genesis 😛 if it's been invented by the chinese, then it's been made 😀

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